James Patterson Teaches Writing Download

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  1. James Patterson Teaches Writing Download For Windows 10
  1. Jul 12, 2017  14 Lessons from James Patterson’s Masterclass. Diana Wink Blocked Unblock Follow Following. Jul 12, 2017. Masterclass and summed it up to 14 valuable lessons authors can learn from his knowledge of the craft and his method of writing. In the videos, James came across as a grounded person. Straightforward, warm. Never miss a story from.
  2. James Patterson – Teaches Writing. October 5, 2018 October 5, 2018 cybertron Miscellaneous, WSO. Sales Page: Click Here Value: $90 Download Size: 2GB Direct Download Link: ( No Ads, No Waiting Time, No Capcha) This content is for members only. 01 Introduction.

James Patterson has a direct, lively and unpretentious manner on camera which is very engaging, both in the main videos and in the critique snippets, and he’s generous with his practical tips and advice. As well, the workbook is thorough and has plenty of interesting exercises, and it’s also easy to download. Get full archive course Masterclass: James Patterson Teaches Writing and more than 2000++ course free, No Ads, No Waiting Time, No Capcha wsoarchives.com. Download Size: 2GB Direct Download Link: (No Ads, No Waiting Time, No Capcha) This content is for members only. 01 Introduction. Your instructor, James Patterson—currently the best-selling author in the world—lets you know what he has planned for your class and what you’ll need to learn to start writing your own best-sellers.

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James Patterson Teaches Writing Download For Windows 10


James patterson teaches writing download for students

https://www.masterclass.com/classes/j...
For $90, James 'hire other people to flesh out my outlines' Patterson will let you watch 22 video lessons in which he will expose all the secrets of putting fiction together.
I expect the 'secrets' are things that lots of people know and that will not explain his success. His success can't be replicated, as like every success, it is the result of variables like timing, personal connections, and the steamroller effect of already being successful, which helps in and of itself to increase success in not all, but very many instances.
Thus we continue the process of marketing 'secrets' to the gullible, where 'secrets' means 'things you don't happen to know.' On the other hand, $90 is not that expensive compared to what he might have been able to command from the rubes. I went to graduate school for five years to get two degrees in writing. That probably cost my parents and the states in which I did it collectively more than $100,000. Wish I could have just gleaned it at JP's knee.


Patterson was a top advertising executive. If he also has teaching skills, he might be worth ninety bucks.
But not to you, Matt, to the people on KB who spend their lives trying to find out what the latest trend this very minute is, so that they can be on it, to the people who spend their days trying to hack the Amazon algorithm so that they can make a few sales.
Patterson's advice is likely to come down to 'Define, find, please, corner your market.'
He's not likely to say much, probably nothing, to people who want to learn to write better.


For most of us, its all about getting above the mulch layer and being seen.
I doubt he has any experience with that.

message 4: by Andre Jute (last edited Jun 22, 2015 02:44PM) (new)

K.A. wrote: 'For most of us, its all about getting above the mulch layer and being seen.
I doubt he has any experience with that.'

I don't know why you say that. Patterson came from advertising. He may have had an advantage over most aspirants in that he knew how to define a market and discover what it wants, and a certain facility with the language.
But besides that, he just wrote damned good books in the beginning, around his character Alex Cross, and worked hard to promote them. I don't think his publishers did anything special for him, as they don't for most authors until they are already successful. It was only later that he turned himself into a fiction factory for the common denominator end of the market. But you can still see what he had back then, the vantage point that a career in advertising gives one, of finding a niche (his is pretty wide, but it is still a niche, more precisely, several niches) and catering for it with a an intense focus.
I don't read him any more -- those kids with wings were just too rubbishy -- but I wish him luck.


This: He may have had an advantage over most aspirants in that he knew how to define a market and discover what it wants, and a certain facility with the language.
He came into the publishing game, knowing exactly how to market, and has done spectacularly well.
I couldn't get into the winged kids either.
He's got the golden touch now.


I hadn't heard of the kids with wings. I just wikipedia-searched that. The series actually looks pretty interesting. If I had a library card and no review queue and didn't despise him I'd give that series a try. Not well-written, Andre?
School year is nearly done. I have several books to finish writing. Would love to publish something this year...


Patterson has SO MANY books out -- hard to keep track of all of them.


Matt wrote: 'I hadn't heard of the kids with wings. I just wikipedia-searched that. The series actually looks pretty interesting. If I had a library card and no review queue and didn't despise him I'd give that series a try. Not well-written, Andre?'
I didn't read the series, just the first one. In his early output, the first Alex Cross books, Patterson started out as a standard American Ivy League-educated writer with aspirations to mass market appeal. That is, good quality but simplified language, a strictly controlled cast of characters, and a simple, straight-forward plot. As he progressed towards being publishing machine rather than merely a writer, the writing became simpler and simpler, deliberately so at first, and probably recently from sloppy haste or his co-writers just not being as talented, until in later times the books I dipped into at the library for a few paragraphs were caricatures of his early style, zero depth, zero literary value, their entire emotional appeal situational -- like how could you not think winged kids cute, maaahn? If you just want to read thoughtless fodder (actually, from a marketing viewpoint, very well-thought-out fodder), he's a sure thing; if you want better quality literature, look to his earliest books or look elsewhere altogether.


Matt wrote: 'School year is nearly done. I have several books to finish writing. Would love to publish something this year... '
Lucky you!


Andre Jute wrote: But besides that, he just wrote damned good books in the beginning...
I don't read him any more -- those kids with wings were just too rubbishy -- but I wish him luck.

I've seen this happen to many authors over the years. Even when I was younger, I followed up a favorite author to find out the next series didn't even feel like it was written by him. Or if it was, somebody slipped something into the drinking water.
I analyzed this over the years. I call it when writers fall out of love with writing. At first, you feel their love for writing in nearly every chapter, and the end of the novel is a great accomplishment. Then it happens. They fall out of love with writing, and it comes across as stiff, soured, almost like curdled milk. It looks good in the jug, but one whiff when the cap comes off tells you something much different.
If I ever fall out of love with writing, I'll merely stop. I refuse to put my readers through that crushing moment when they realize my work is ... stale enough to be bitter.


I think they might not have much of a choice, if their publisher tells them 'give me the next Alphabet Murder' what else are they going to do?
They can't afford to write a stinker, so they can't take chances and write something different.
Janet Evanovich wrote some really funny novels -- at first. I think I quit reading her at number 10.

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